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Showing posts from 2016

Christmas Tree Selection & Care | an interview with Ron Wolford

extension.illinois.edu/treesChristmas just isn’t Christmas without a real Christmas tree. The following are a few hints to help you select that perfect tree whether you purchase it from a neighborhood lot or a Christmas tree farm.Decide on where you will place the tree. Will it be seen from all sides or will some of it be up against a wall? Be sure to choose a spot away from heat sources, such as TVs, fireplaces, radiators and air ducts. Place the tree clear of doors.Measure the height and width of the space you have available in the room where the tree will be placed. There is nothing worse than bringing a tree indoors only to find it’s too tall. Take a tape measure with you to measure your chosen tree and bring a cord to tie your tree to the car.Remember that trees sold on retail lots in urban areas may have come from out of state and may have been exposed to drying winds in transit. They may have been cut weeks earlier.Buy trees early before the best trees have been sold and where …

How to Connect your Site to the Prospective Business | webinar

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University of Illinois Extension’s Community and Economic Development team will host a free webinar, Site Selection: How to Connect your Site to the Prospective Business, on Thursday, December 8, 2016 from Noon to 1PM, Central Time.



The webinar, a final in Local Government Education’s fall series on economic development in Illinois, will feature Cheryl Welge, who will be presenting a more detailed discussion of the site selection process. In the previous site selection webinar, we covered the state and technical aspects of Location One and site selection in Illinois. During this upcoming webinar, Cheryl will share her expertise on capacity requirements for site selection from the site selector perspective.

As a senior business development executive in Ameren Corporation’s Economic Development Department, Cheryl serves as the business development contact for a twenty-two county region in western, central and southwestern Illinois. In this role, she implements Ameren’s community and bu…

2016 Gross Farm Revenue & Income

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It looks like this year is going to be better than last year for farmers in central Illinois. Todd Gleason explores how gross income has changed for row croppers in the middle of the prairie state.



The gross revenue for corn is $292 per acre. It is tallied from three income sources. The crop is worth $262. There was a $20 farm safety net payment from the ARC-County program and a $10 crop insurance indemnity. The total, again $292, is lower than last year says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey, “Even though we are putting in a very high yield, we are using 231 bushels to the acre for the corn average - the same as in 2014, revenues will be down for corn in 2016 as compared to 2015”.



Schnitkey calculated the gross revenue figures for the farmdocdaily website.

The soybean figures add up in a similar fashion. The gross revenue is estimated to total $718 per acre. It’s a figure much higher than the 2015 gross says the agricultural economist, “We are including ver…

Illinois Farm Economic Summits

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The big story in Illinois agriculture in 2016 continued to be the “margin squeeze” faced by crop producers. This squeeze was brought on by low corn, soybean, and wheat prices and costs of production that are only slowly adjusting to the new price realities. At present prices, further cost of production reductions will be required. Producers and landowners face a series of difficult management challenges as they grapple with how to adjust to the changed environment. Should cash rents be lowered? And if so, by how much? How much relief will be seen through lower fertilizer and seed prices? What are the prospects for grain prices to recover from current depressed levels?

University of Illinois Extension and members of the farmdoc team from the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics will be holding a series of five Farm Economics Summit meetings to help producers navigate these difficult times.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER TODAY

Speakers from the farmdoc team at the University of I…

EPA Renewable Fuels Standard Rallies Soybean Oil Prices

Source | Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The price of soybeans rallied about 10 percent from mid-October to mid-November. It came,despite the record sized crop harvested in the United States. Farmers have been in awe of the soybean market since mid-August. There have been a few reasons for it to rally; a short crop out of South America and a drought constrained supply of palm oil coming from Indonesia for instance. Still, this U.S. soybean crop is big, mighty big in fact. Yet, the price of soybeans has gone higher. Darrel Good writes about it in this week’s Weekly Outlook. You may read it online at FarmDocDaily. There are two unusual things about this price rally. Well, one really, but it is driven by the first. The rally has come because the world seems to be short of vegetable oils. Soybean oil is among those. Here’s the important part, soybean oil lead rallies generally do not last. Darrel Good thinks this one might and that it could change the dynamics…

Could Soybean Stocks Grow to 580 Million

Depending upon how you do the numbers there could be an enormous supply of soybeans in the U.S. by the time the fall of 2018 rolls around. The large soybean crop in the United States hasn’t, yet, pummeled prices in Chicago. However, farmers are a bit worried the hammer blow will be struck. For now, much of the focus is on the potential size of the 2017 South American crops and the implications for demand for U.S. grown soybeans. Increasingly, however focus will shift to 2017 production prospects here in the United States. The over-riding question is whether surpluses and low prices will persist for another year. Although University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good says it is a bit early to speculate on supply and consumption prospects for the 2017–18 marketing year, he thinks some scenarios can be considered.For soybeans, there is a general expectation that U.S. producers will increase acreage in the year ahead. An increase of about five million acres, to 88 million harv…

US Corn Ethanol Market | an interview with Carl Zulauf

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Ethanol was a factor in both the price run-up that began in 2006 and the price run-down that began in 2013. Tepid growth replaced explosive growth. The question for the future is, “What is ethanol’s organic growth rate (growth without government policy stimulus)?” Recent history suggests growth will continue in the corn ethanol market, but it likely will be notably lower than the growth in yields. Thus, upward pressure on corn prices is less likely.

Corn Ethanol in Historical Perspective
US Department of Agriculture data on US corn processed into US ethanol begin with the 1980 crop. It is reported monthly in the World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates. Corn processed into ethanol grew at an average annual rate of 6% between 1985 and 2000, exploded to a 24% annual growth rate between 2000 and 2010, then slowed to 1% per year after 2010 Ethanol Growth vs. Yield Growth. The explosive growth in the first decade of this Century largely coincides with the impact of government policie…

Watch the Feed Usage Number for Corn

Last week, when USDA raised the sized of the U.S. corn crop, there was a collective gasp in farm country. Prices are already very low, and an even bigger crop wasn’t expected. All attention now has turned to how this mammoth supply will be used in hopes consumption can chew through the mountain of corn. U.S. farmers are harvesting their largest corn crop on record at some 15.2 billion bushels. It’s the western corn belt that really came through this year with big yields. The November USDA Crop Production report shows that even in the last month those yields got bigger. Up 3 bushel to the acre in Nebraska and South Dakota. 4 bushels higher in Minnesota. And a 17 bushel to the acre increase in North Dakota that came about once farmers (the only real source for yields in that state) took a look at the yield monitors in their combines. The increased yield for the corn crop creates a scenario says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs where the ending stocks to use ratio…

Trump | Now what for U.S. Corn Exports

Tom Sleight, CEO of the United States Grains Council discusses the future of U.S. grain exports under a Donald Trump administration.

Crop Insurance Payments - an interview with Gary Schnitkey

Harvest prices used to determine crop insurance payments for corn and soybean policies in the Midwest are based on Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME Group) futures settlement prices during the month of October. The 2016 harvest price for corn is $3.49 per bushel. This is 10% lower than the $3.86 projected price set in February. The soybean harvest price is $9.75 per bushel. That’s 10% higher than the $8.85 projected price. For the most part it means crop insurance payments to farmers will be relatively low says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey.

Assessing the Potential for Higher Corn Prices

The odds are against four dollar cash corn this year and next, at least for any extended period of time. The monthly average cash price paid to farmers in the United States for their corn has been less than $4.00 a bushel for 27 consecutive months. It’s likely to stay that way well into 2017, too, says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good unless something changes, “Some combination of a reduction in corn supplies and increased consumption will be required in order for prices to move above $4.00 per bushel for an extended time.”On the supply side, or how much corn is around, USDA’s next Crop Production report is due November 9th. It will contain a new forecast of the size of the 2016 U.S. corn crop. Previous history of yield forecast changes in November in years when the forecast declined in September and again in October as was the case this year, says Darrel Good, show very mixed results with 5 moving lower, 1 unchanged, and 4 of the ten getting bigger. The trade…

Illinois Water Conference | Reducing Nutrient Losses

Participants in the University of Illinois 2016 Water Quality Conference Reducing Nutrient Losses panel discuss ways in which farmers and landowners can manage water quality.Laura Christianson, Crop Sciences - University of IllinoisRuth Book, State Conservation Engineer - USDA NRCSJason Solberg, Illinois Fertilizer & Chemical AssociationDebbie Fluegel, Trees Forever

Soybean Yields in Illinois

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via FarmDocDaily
by Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois

In recent years, soybean yields in Illinois have been exceptional, leading to questions on whether technologies have caused a "jump" in soybean yields. While the 2016 state yield will be an outlier, it is too early to say that a new regime of soybean yields exists. Relative to corn yields, soybean yields must increase more to have the same relative yields as in the early 1970s.

Comparing Soybean Yields to Trend

State soybean yields for Illinois have been exceptional from 2014 through 2016. In 2014, Illinois' soybean yield was 56 bushels per acre. The 2014 yield was a record high, 4.5 bushels per acre higher than the next highest yield of 51.5 set in 2010. The 2015 state yield again was 56 bushel per acre. In 2016, a new record will be set, with state yield estimated at 62 bushels per acre in the October Crop Production report produced by the National Agricultural Statistical Service. A 20…

Big Crop Strong Exports an interview with Todd Hubbs

It is likely the export markets along with South American production prospects will drive only periodic price increases for corn and soybeans says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs in this interview with Todd Gleason.FarmDocDaily Source

Just in Time Parenting

visit Just in Time Parenting website


USDA October Reports

University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good reviews the October 12, 2016 Crop Production and WASDE reports including his thoughts on how it changes off-farm storage decisions.

Sell Soybeans for Cash Needs

The United States Department of Agriculture has reported the size of this year’s soybean crop and for the second month in a row it has increased the size of what was already a record breaker. That trend is likely to continue.USDA, in its October Crop Production report, raised the average national soybean yield by eight-tenths of a bushel. It now stands at 51.4 bushels to the acre and about 4.3 billion bushels strong. It is already a serious record breaker, but not likely big enough, yet, says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good.Well, I think, taking all the evidence together, saying now that we got bigger in September, and we got bigger in October on soybeans, and the crop is already very big…I think would point to another small increase in the yield forecast in November and perhaps in January as well. So, maybe not by a lot, but I certainly wouldn’t expect the number to come down from what we are looking at right now. –Darrel GoodHowever, even in the face of a r…

Harrington Seed Destructor Testing

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The Harrington Seed Destructor is being tested by the University of Illinois for field level efficacy to control herbicide resistant weeds.

Green Infrastructure & Stress an interview with Bill Sullivan

If you are looking for an easy way to release some of the stress in your life, you might think about taking a walk in a park or just buying some house plants.

Grain Farm Working Capital Nearly Exhausted

Four consecutive years of lower commodity prices has nearly exhausted the financial resources of U.S. grain farmers. Todd Gleason looks into the problem with an agricultural economist from the University of Illinois.

Too Early to Sell the 2017 Soybean Crop

There’s a nagging question farmers are wondering about as they harvest what is quite likely to be their best soybean crop ever. Is it so good, so plentiful, that it might be time to consider selling some of next year’s crop. Let’s start with some plain facts. The price of soybeans from April through August was higher, on average, than it was in the prior seven months. This says Darrel Good is because the trade expected there to be a whole lot of soybeans leftover from last years harvest by the time right now arrived. Something like 450 million bushels. That didn’t happen. The South American crop failed and U.S. exports jumped by 250 million bushels. Like most of the previous years, all but one since 2008, this left fewer than 200 bushels in the bin from the previous season’s soybean crop. Here’s how Good, a University of Illinois Agricultural Economist, says that should all play out in the coming months. With consumption during the 2016–17 marketing already projected to be record larg…

Not Much Chance USDA Will Change Corn Yield or Acreage

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Early corn yield reports have been good, but pretty variable. There are more than few concerns about a disease called diplodia, too. Some are beginning to piece these items together to make a case for USDA to lower its corn yield estimate. This isn’t very likely thinks University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good. “The fact is”, says Darrel Good, “if you look at the last 20 years of history, there is a strong tendency of the corn yield estimate to get higher in January compared to what it was in September. This has happened 70% of the time in the last 20 years, and almost 70% of the time in the last 40 years. So, those looking for a lower estimate are bucking history, but you can’t rule it out.”Maybe not, but even if the USDA yield changes it won’t be by much thinks Darrel Good. Certainly not enough to really alter the supply/demand balance sheet changing it from a surplus to a tight supply situation. He doesn’t expect USDA to change the acreage numbers much either. This …

Waiting for a Shift in U.S. Corn Acres

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Farmers in the United States are about to harvest one of their best corn crops ever and prices are low. They may need to hang on to the crop for while if they want a better offer, and that could take a shift to soybeans next spring.


The United States Department of Agriculture judges this year’s corn crop to be a record breaker. If it all comes in as predicted in USDA’s September reports there will be none bigger, and the market believes it so far. The price of corn has dropped about a dollar a bushel since earlier in the summer. This price isn’t likely to change much thinks Darrel Good until some new information comes along in one of the USDA reports, and that might not be until next spring.
As long as we have that kind of carryover prospects, the market sees no reason to push prices higher to reduce consumption. - Darrel Good The big response he’ll be looking for is in U.S. acreage next spring, says Good. The agricultural economist suggests the price of corn now, when compared to th…

Quick Ship Soybeans and Storing Corn

The rains falling across the Midwest are delaying harvest for the moment, but they may also bring with them a sales opportunity for farmers. That's because the amount of soybeans left in the nation is pretty small, and processors are in need. University of Illinois agricultural economist Darrel Good says, if farmers can get in and harvest, they might find some pretty good basis levels.

We are coming off a period in central Illinois when spot soybean prices were running well above November futures. Twenty to thirty cents above, but it has begun to erode. However, we are still looking at prices pretty close to option value. It says to me with big yields and that kind of price, well over $9.00, revenue looks pretty good by selling some soybeans at least, if not a majority of the soybeans right out of the field. -Darrel Good

The sooner the better and the higher the quick ship premium, although those are likely to disappear quickly thinks Darrel Good.
Store #corn, but you’ll need to han…

2016 County Cash Rents | an interview with Gary Schnitkey

The National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS) - an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture - released average county cash rents for 2016 the second week of September. These county rents are used to imply average rents for different expected corn yields in the state of Illinois.

Bayer to Purchase Monsanto

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Bayer and Monsanto today announced that they signed a definitive merger agreement under which Bayer will acquire Monsanto for $128 U.S. dollars per share in an all-cash transaction.

Bayer Ag Brands
Monsanto Brands

The combined agriculture business will have its global Seeds & Traits and North American commercial headquarters in St. Louis, Missouri, its global Crop Protection and overall Crop Science headquarters in Monheim, Germany, and an important presence in Durham, North Carolina, as well as many other locations throughout the U.S. and around the world. The Digital Farming activities for the combined business will be based in San Francisco, California.

Advancing Together is the company website dedicated to explaining the deal. Bayer employs 116,800 people around the planet. Monsanto employs more than 20,000 of which about 12,000 are based in the United States.




When the merger is complete, scheduled for sometime in 2017, the combined company will be nearly balanced with approx…

USDA Reports | September 12, 2016

USDA Crop Production and WASDE reports released 11am central Monday September 12, 2016. Visit our USDA Reports page for full details.


Corn production is forecast at 15.1 billion bushels, up 11 percent from last year but down less than one percent from the August forecast. Based on conditions as of September 1, yields are expected to average 174.4 bushels per acre, down 0.7 bushel from the August forecast but up 6 bushels from 2015. If realized, this will be the highest yield and production on record for the United States. Area harvested for grain is forecast at 86.6 million acres, unchanged from the August forecast, but up 7 percent from 2015.

Soybean production is forecast at a record 4.20 billion bushels, up 3 percent from August and up 7 percent from last year. Based on September 1 conditions, yields are expected to average a record 50.6 bushels per acre, up 1.7 bushels from last month and up 2.6 bushels from last year. Area for harvest in the United States is forecast at a record 83…

Grain Farm Income & Cash Rent Outlook

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by Todd E. Gleason



Urbana, Illinois - Wednesday morning September 7, 2016 University of Illinois Extension Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey presented a webinar looking forward into 2017. The discussion centered on farm profitability, projected income, and cash rents. You may the watch the webinar. What follows is a summary of the hour long content.





The USDA WASDE monthly average corn price is $4.67 from 2006 to 2016. The price of corn has been below this average since the fall of 2013 & Gary Schnitkey believes it is likely to continue to stay below this average through the 2017/18 crop year.

Each year USDA tracks the average marketing year cash price. This price is updated monthly in the World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report. The average cash price for corn from 1975 to 2005 is $2.33, $5.95 for soybeans. This is a long term national average cash price. The USDA projected estimates for this marketing year (2016/17) are currently $3.15 and $9.10. The USDA estima…

September Starters

Wednesday 8am-9am central

GRAIN FARM INCOME &
CASH RENT OUTLOOK
with @Gschnitkey

LEARN https://t.co/jN1pvOPUsqpic.twitter.com/TqsSpHKR1f — Todd E. Gleason (@commodityweek) September 6, 2016


Purdue benchmarked corn production around the globe on

READ https://t.co/e8INsKzRrbhttps://t.co/lNZ5iUxymPpic.twitter.com/Dn2TpiahOr — Todd E. Gleason (@commodityweek) September 6, 2016


Sep Crop Production Guesses

INFORMA
C 174.8 15.300
SB 49.5 4.127

FCSTONE
C 175.6 15.195
SB 50.1 4.163 pic.twitter.com/YJbQ05OckW — Todd E. Gleason (@commodityweek) September 4, 2016

Low Returns, Crop Prices Keeping Pressure on Farmland Values

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(Boone, IA, August 31, 2016) – Illinois farmland values continued their pullback around the state during the first half of 2016 as prices retraced between an estimated 3.3 percent and 7 percent. Continued low net returns and softening commodity prices are cited as the primary cause of the decrease. This is according to the Mid-Year “Snapshot Survey” information gathered by the Illinois Society of Professional Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers as well as the Illinois Farm and Land Chapter of the REALTORS® Land Institute (RLI). The data analysis is provided by Gary Schnitkey, Ph.D., with the University of Illinois College of ACES. The survey is part of an ongoing and larger annual Land Values and Lease Trends project conducted by the Society.

The survey results were released today at the Farm Progress Show being held in Boone, IA.

According to the survey, below $4 per bushel prices paid for corn are expected to continue into 2017 with some decreases in production costs expected. Cash …

Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour

Why USDA's Ear Weight is Unlikely to Change

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Illinois State Fair Sale of Champions

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Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner purchased the Grand Champion Steer at the Illinois State for a record setting $104,000.

Governor Rauner Announces Illinois State Fair Foundation

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The Illinois State Fair has a new funding source. Governor Bruce Rauner has announced the creation of the Illinois State Fair Foundation. He says it is a non-governmental, non-political, privately run 501c3 Not-for-Profit to be operated by farmers and community leaders.The private foundation was created after the Illinois State government failed to pass legislation last year to create a similar board. The private foundation will work to restore and maintain the Illinois State Fair in Springfield, and the DuQuoin State Fair in the southern part of the state.
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You may follow the progress of the Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour August 22-25 on WILLAg.org. Watch for live in field results from the tour scouts as they gather information from corn and soybean field across the Midwest. The updates will come directly from a series of crop scouts. Monday through Thursday we'll also bring you audio updates from Pro Farmer's Brian Grete and Chip Flory. Those updates will air during the 2:06-2:36pm Closing Market Report. Friday Brian Grete will join the Commodity Week panel to review the tour results, Pro Farmer's official estimation of the 2016 crop, and compare those to USDA's August report. You may learn more about the tour on the Pro Farmer website.

2016 Illinois Corn & Soybean at Mid-Season with Emerson Nafziger

Urbana - University of Illinois Extension Agronomist Emerson Nafziger discusses the potential of the corn and soybean crops at mid-season.PLAYLISTCorn (tipback)Soybean (tall)Growing Degree Days (frost)

IPPA Responds to Chicago Tribune "The Price of Pork" Series

Chicago Tribune “The Price of Pork”
Jennifer Tirey, Executive Director - Illinois Pork Producers Association

New Site for August 18th U of I Agronomy Day

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Agronomy Day on the University of Illinois campus is Thursday August 18th.Agronomy Day at ILLINOIS has moved this year. It’ll be a bit further south of campus at the new facilities on the First Street farm says University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager. The south First Street facility is about 3 miles or so from the usual place, however, it is in a different city on the map. The address is Savoy. Just go straight south from the U of I’s football and basketball arena’s on First Street and you’ll find the farm on the east side of the road. The doors open at 7am Thursday August 18th, with a meal at the noon hour.

Marketing a Low Priced High Volume Corn Crop

The price of corn is predicted to stay low this coming year because the size of the crop should be really big. Todd Gleason has more on just how a farmer might go about marketing under such conditions. The numbers aren’t pretty as it relates to this year’s corn crop, at least other than the number of bushels in the bin. It should be a great big one, something on the order of 15 billion bushels thinks Darrel Good. Each of those bushels will be worth a lot less than they would have been earlier in the year and now farmers must figure out how to make a lower price and a higher yield result in a sustainable income. The price is too low to call it anything more than sustainable and the crop is too big to put it all in storage says the University of Illinois agricultural economist.Quote Summary - So, some sales must be made between now and the end of the harvest period. Getting the extra bushels sold in the next few weeks is probably a good idea as pressure continue on futures and basis thr…

Control Mosquito Larvae & Protect Yourself

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Foggers used by cities and towns can be a pretty effective tool for controlling mosquitos. They can even be used around the house. It is best, however, to start with the basics. Both types of disease carrying mosquitos need standing water to hatch. Get rid of it, especially if it is nasty water says University of Illinois Extension Entomologist Phil Nixon. Quote Summary - Those mosquitos are quiet biters, they will sneak up and bite you. They are the ones in the case of the northern house mosquito, transmitting west nile virus and in the case of the Asian tiger mosquito Zika virus, if it gets established this coming summer. Both of these mosquitos tend to be short range flyers, usually a quarter to half a mile, and so what you do on your own property and what your neighbors do can make a huge difference in the numbers of these mosquitos and the likelyhood of being bitten. The first line of defense says Phil Nixon, and the Centers for Disease Control, is to protect your own person and …

Rachael Erin Nichole

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Sunday July 17, 2016

She was doing everything right, and we still lost our Rachael Erin Nichole. She went quickly into the evening sunlight yesterday in Branson, Missouri. A place she and her mother both love.

Claranne and I thank our friends and family for their prayers. Rachael was with us only briefly, but it seemed as natural to us as if she'd been in our home all her life. We loved her as our own, and our children had already adopted Rach as a sister. She is gone from us far to soon... a heart transplant miracle from five years ago that simply succumbed suddenly and without warning.



Rachael loved life and everyone surrounding her. She knew no stranger, and endearingly called most aunt or uncle. Her world was filled with her pets, technology and innocence. She loved movies and General Hospital and the color pink. She had an infectious smile and a dismissive, but sweet eye roll, that could simultaneously amuse and correct. She wanted everyone to be happy.  Visitation will begin a…

Soybean Prices Dominated By Supply Uncertainty

The price of soybeans is being driving by supply side uncertainties. The new crop November soybean contract traded at the CME Group in Chicago reached its current contract high price of $11.86 a bushel about a month ago. This is $3.22 above the low made last November. University of Illinois agricultural economist Darrel Good says as is typically the case this time of year, price direction will now be mostly determined by the estimated size of the U.S. crop, with the pace of consumption playing a minor role.Quote Summary - Forecasts of an upcoming period of above normal temperatures in the U.S., a continuation of strong export sales, and a strong pace to the domestic crush have helped support the recent modest price rally.While the strong pace of export sales and the domestic crush may have provided modest support for soybean prices, the major focus writes Darrel Good in this week’s Weekly Outlook found on the FarmDocDaily website has been and will continue to be on U.S. weather and yi…

July 5 | USDA NASS Weekly Crop Progress Report

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NOAA Predicted 7 Day Rain Fall Starting July 1

Here is the current Predicted 7 Day Precipitation Totals from @NOAA. Map starts from today. pic.twitter.com/BMBH6O76OG — Todd E. Gleason (@commodityweek) July 1, 2016
Predicted Rain Fall via @NOAA
- Friday
- Saturday
- Sunday pic.twitter.com/HTCJVZxDor — Todd E. Gleason (@commodityweek) July 1, 2016
June Precip % of normal. This along with the high heat makes June a rough month in the corn belt. Precip coming... pic.twitter.com/eEhKikqMZD — Todd E. Gleason (@commodityweek) July 1, 2016