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Nov 18 | WILLAg Newsletter

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November 18, 2018

This Tuesday you are invited to Normal, Illinois for the Farm Assets Conference. I’ve seen parts of the presentations that will be made and fully expect this to be an impactful event. The tickets are $40. Our doors open at 9:30am at the Marriott Hotel and Conference Center. If you arrive by 8am the Illinois Corn Growers Association will provide you with breakfast and you may attend their annual meeting prior to the Farm Assets Conference.

purchase your ticket by noon Monday
http://www.farmassetsconference.com

I’ve been traveling the last couple of weeks and thought you might find these three articles from the farmdocDaily website interesting.

Todd
Financial and Risk Management Decisions for 2019What to Expect from USMCA (or NAFTA 1.01)Nitrogen Loss Reduction Practices: What Do They Cost?Financial and Risk Management Decisions for 2019
Gary Schnitkey and Krista Swanson
Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics
University of Illinois

With planning for next yea…

2018 Farm Assets Conference

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November 3, 2018

Dear Subscriber,

I hope your harvest season has gone well. As it winds down please consider making a trek to Normal, Illinois for the 2018 Farm Assets Conference. This is a pivotal year for agriculture. Things from this point forward will be different. Changes are coming rapidly. We’re going to address some of the possibilities.

Please come and listen. Please come and ask questions. Personally, I use these events as learning experiences to help tailor the daily WILLAg radio programming. It is a direct reaction to the questions you ask.

The cost is only $40 and we’ve put together a fantastic agenda. Do scroll down to find out more. The 2018 Farm Assets Conference is in Normal, Illinois at the Marriott Hotel and Conference Center on November 20th. Our doors open at 9:30am. The Illinois Corn Growers Association annual meeting precedes it at 8:00am.

buy your tickets now

Todd E. Gleason, Farm Broadcaster
University of Illinois Extension | WILLAg.org
tgleason@illinois.edu or …

WANL181031

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October 31, 2018
Market Facilitation Payments Program a Go for DecemberHow will the 2019 Acreage Mix ChangeUnwinding New Era Crop Acreage and Prices


Register for the Farm Assets Conference today. The cost is just $40 and includes the price of parking and your noon meal. Come to learn more about how large corporations like Anheuser Busch and McDonald’s are reaching all the way through the supply chain to tap farmers on the shoulder looking for production practices and seed characteristics which meet their needs. It is likely to change how commodity crops are marketed over the next decade. The CME Group, ADM, Cargill, Bunge, and Louis Dreyfus are already preparing for this eventuality. However, might it be possible the middleman in the system will become a distribution system rather than the marketing arm? We’ll explore these concepts during the 2018 Farm Assets Conference.

Register Online today or by calling 800–898–1065

Click here to see the full agenda or scroll to the bottom of this …

Corn and Soybean Acreage Prospects for 2019

As US farmers finish the fall harvest, considerable speculation will occur over the next few months about the acreage decisions they’ll make for 2019. Todd Gleason discusses how current market conditions support an acreage increase next year for corn and a reduction for soybeans with University of Illinois agricultural economist Todd Hubbs.farmdocDaily article
by Todd Hubbs, University of IllinoisProspects for 2019 crop acreage levels begin with expectations about planted acreage for principal crops. In 2018, acreage planted in principal field crops expanded to 322 million acres, up 2.9 million acres from the previous year. A large share of increased acreage came from an expansion of spring wheat acreage by 2.18 million acres, cotton acreage by 1.4 million acres, and hay acreage by 1.28 million acres. Corn and soybean acreage decreased by 1.03 and .997 million acres respectively. Illinois increased planted acreage by 188,000 acres like most of the primary Corn Belt states. A significa…

Take a Good Hard Look at Selling Soybeans

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The price of soybeans rallied out of the October USDA Crop Production report. This is because it showed fewer acres of the crop would be harvested this season. University of Illinois analyst Todd Hubbs thinks the upside potential is limited, “I don’t know if this thing is sustainable. It doesn’t feel that way to me. Moving through the rest of the harvest year and towards the start of 2019, I think we are going to have to see some kind of production issues in the South American crop or if China breaks and doesn’t hold out completely on taking U.S. soybeans before we see a sustained upward movement. I think the upside potential is limited.”

Limited because, even if this year’s crop is hurt some by the poor harvest conditions so far it will remain a record breaker. Right now USDA has it at 4.7 billion bushels. There are plenty of soybeans in the world. That makes it a buyers market and price is going to depend a whole lot upon how many U.S soybeans can be exported says Hubbs, “Basically…

A Good Year for Pumpkins

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This year’s pumpkin crop is the best in the last two decades. That means there will be plenty of jack-o-lanterns for Halloween and lots of pie filling for Thanksgiving.When the pumpkin crop in Illinois is big that means the whole nation can celebrate fall says Mohammad Babadoost from the Univeristy of Illinois, “We are number one in both of them, jack-o-lantern and processing pumpkins. Far, far ahead of any other state.” More than 90% of the pumpkin pie filling sold in the United States comes from two processing plants located near Peoria, Illinois. This year the pumpkins feeding into those plants are yielding a record breaking 27 tons per acre. The average is about 23. This is pretty amazing given that a plant disease nearly wiped out the whole industry in the state a couple of decades ago. Babadoost is naturally proud of his University of Illinois work to salvage the industry from the disease and he continues to work with farmers today to provide them crop production and protection …

Reviewing Prices and Market Facilitation Payments

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read farmdocDaily article



As the trade conflict with China continues, prices for many agricultural commodities remain relatively low. Illinois corn and soybean prices dipped to new lows in September, coinciding with the latest rounds of tariffs.



The difference between selling an entire crop at spring forward bid prices compared to the September average cash prices makes a substantial difference in income on an average central Illinois grain farm.



University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey reviews how this plays out on a 1700 acre corn and soybean farm in Illinois this year, and what the prospects look like for next year.