Rachael Erin Nichole

Sunday July 17, 2016

She was doing everything right, and we still lost our Rachael Erin Nichole. She went quickly into the evening sunlight yesterday in Branson, Missouri. A place she and her mother both love.

Claranne and I thank our friends and family for their prayers. Rachael was with us only briefly, but it seemed as natural to us as if she'd been in our home all her life. We loved her as our own, and our children had already adopted Rach as a sister. She is gone from us far to soon... a heart transplant miracle from five years ago that simply succumbed suddenly and without warning.



Rachael loved life and everyone surrounding her. She knew no stranger, and endearingly called most aunt or uncle. Her world was filled with her pets, technology and innocence. She loved movies and General Hospital and the color pink. She had an infectious smile and a dismissive, but sweet eye roll, that could simultaneously amuse and correct. She wanted everyone to be happy. 
Visitation will begin at 9 a.m. Thursday July 21, 2016 at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Peoria, Illinois followed by a memorial Mass of Christian burial at 10 a.m., with Father Jim Pankiewicz as celebrant. A committal service will follow at the Chapel of Peace at Parkview Cemetery. A celebration of life gathering immediately follow.

Todd & Claranne Gleason
1603 Spring Creek Drive
Mahomet, Illinois 61853  

Donations in Memory of Rachael Van Dyke may be made to Ronald McDonald House RMHC of St. Louis at http://www.rmhc.org/ The charity helped Rachael and her family in their time of need.
1. website - http://www.rmhc.org
2. then hit red DONATE flag
3. choose RMHC of St. Louis near the bottom of the RMHC CHAPTER TABLE
4. select Donation in Memory
5. fill in your information
6. make HONOR/MEMORIAL INFORMATION = Rachael Van Dyke
Should you want to notify the family of your donation select "Send eCard" and put Todd Gleason under Email Recipient Name and todd.e.gleason@gmail.com under email address.

Soybean Prices Dominated By Supply Uncertainty

The price of soybeans is being driving by supply side uncertainties.

The new crop November soybean contract traded at the CME Group in Chicago reached its current contract high price of $11.86 a bushel about a month ago. This is $3.22 above the low made last November. University of Illinois agricultural economist Darrel Good says as is typically the case this time of year, price direction will now be mostly determined by the estimated size of the U.S. crop, with the pace of consumption playing a minor role.

Quote Summary - Forecasts of an upcoming period of above normal temperatures in the U.S., a continuation of strong export sales, and a strong pace to the domestic crush have helped support the recent modest price rally.

While the strong pace of export sales and the domestic crush may have provided modest support for soybean prices, the major focus writes Darrel Good in this week’s Weekly Outlook found on the FarmDocDaily website has been and will continue to be on U.S. weather and yield prospects.

The main short term uncertainty surrounds the duration of an upcoming period of above normal temperatures for much of the soybean production area. With so much of the growing season remaining, however, yield uncertainty could persist for several more weeks. The resulting price fluctuations will provide opportunities for producers to make additional sales in the run-up to harvest.

There is enough time and enough uncertainty in the market at this point for rallies to still come. When this happens Darrel Good believes farmers should reward the market with additional soybean sales.

NOAA Predicted 7 Day Rain Fall Starting July 1



June 17 | USDA NASS Weekly Crop Progress Report





Statistical Methodology
via USDA NASS

Weekly Crop Progress Report Survey Procedures: Crop progress and condition estimates are based on survey data collected each week from early April through the end of November. The non-probability crop progress and condition surveys include input from approximately 4,000 respondents whose occupations provide them opportunities to make visual observations and frequently bring them in contact with farmers in their counties. Based on standard definitions, these respondents subjectively estimate the progress of crops through various stages of development, as well as the progress of producer activities. They also provide subjective evaluations of crop conditions.

Most respondents complete their questionnaires on Friday or early Monday morning and submit them to the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) Field Offices in their States by mail, telephone, fax, e-mail, or through a secured internet website. A small number of reports are completed on Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday. Regardless of when questionnaires are completed, respondents are asked to report for the entire week ending on Sunday. For reports submitted prior to the Sunday reference date, a degree of uncertainty is introduced by projections for weekend changes in progress and condition. By the end of the 2015 season, over 90 percent of the data were being submitted through the internet website. As a result, the majority of all data are submitted on Monday morning, significantly reducing projection uncertainty.

Respondents are sent written reporting instructions at the beginning of each season and are contacted periodically to ensure proper reporting. Terms and definitions of crop stages and condition categories used as reporting guidelines are available on the NASS website at www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/National_Crop_Progress.

Estimating Procedures: Reported data are reviewed for reasonableness and consistency by comparing with data reported the previous week and data reported in surrounding counties for the current week. Field Offices summarize the reported data to district and State levels, weighting each county’s reported data by NASS county acreage estimates. Summarized indications are compared with previous week estimates, and progress items are compared with earlier stages of development and historical averages to ensure reasonableness. Weather events and respondent comments are also taken into consideration. State estimates are submitted to the Agricultural Statistics Board (ASB) along with supporting comments, where they are compared with surrounding States and compiled into a National level summary by weighting each State by its acreage estimates.

Revision Policy: Progress and condition estimates in the Crop Progress report are released after 4:00 pm ET on the first business day of the week. These estimates are subject to revision the following week.

Agronomy Day on the South Farms August 18, 2016

URBANA, Ill. – Have questions about pest resistance or curious about the use of drones in agriculture? Plan to hear more on these and other topics related to crop sciences at the 59th annual Agronomy Day at the University of Illinois on August 18.

Field tour topics and speakers for Agronomy Day 2016 were recently announced. Topics include:

TOUR A
Cataloging the weapons arsenal of the Fusarium head blight pathogen
Genetic resistance for northern leaf blight and Goss’ wilt in corn
Stripe rust and scab resistance in wheat
Bt resistance in corn rootworm beetles Nematodes: How does the worm turn?

TOUR B
Nitrogen management: Balancing profitability with sustainability
Economics of nutrient management
Land values
Six weed management predictions to keep you up at night
Investigating low crop emergence in edamame

TOUR C
The show must go on: Balancing water use under continuously changing environmental conditions
Cover crops for soybean and corn rotation
Soybean planting date and variety maturity
Managing soybeans for high yields Drone information and demonstration

TOUR D
*Offered at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. (tentative) with limited availability, as attendees will be transported offsite to SoyFACE. Attendees will need to sign up in advance at the registration table. Tours will last one hour.

What is SoyFACE?
Improving maize tolerance in air pollution CO2
Improving drought tolerance and water use efficiency in C4 crops

For a full list of this year’s speakers and topics, visit http://agronomyday.cropsci.illinois.edu/.

Agronomy Day attracts more than 1,000 people each year seeking the latest information on technology and techniques to improve food and fuel production. This year, agronomy day will be held in a new location at 4202 South 1st Street in Savoy, Illinois. For more information on speakers, displays, and location, join Agronomy Day 2016 on Facebook or visit the Agronomy Day website.

National GMO Labeling Bill in Motion

The U.S. Senate’s agricultural committee has reached a food labeling bill agreement that could set aside the state of Vermont’s GMO law. Ranking members Pat Roberts of Kansas, a Republican, and Debbie Stabenaw, a Michigan Democrat, announced a digital codes compromise. If the full Senate and the House pass the legislation food packages containing a narrowly defined set of genetically engineered ingredients would include a digital disclosure code or an on package symbol or language that the Agriculture Department would approve. The code, which could be scanned by a smartphone, would be accompanied by the sentence, “Scan here for more food information”.

The compromise narrowly defines genetically modified for the purposes of food labels. Only ingredients derived from GMO’s made by transferring genes from one organism to another would require labeling. Foods made with ingredients where the genetic code is edited - a deleted or duplicated gene for example - would not require the GMO notifications.

COMMENTARY: Robert's Rules of Order

What risks are there to organizing a sit-in on the floor of the House of Representatives?
Will the Ethics Committee be called to action?
Honestly, what happened on the floor of the House in my opinion is deplorable. It breaks down the rules of debate that are set up for just reasons to allow the majority (whichever party or however it is comprised) to rule. The rules allow debate to be orderly, and for the minority opinion to be heard. It does not require a vote on that opinion. This works for all parties/individuals and I am fearful what happened here will have far reaching and ill affects.
Robert’s Rules of Oder were devised, originally, from the rules of the House of Representatives. The House, therefore, has a long and storied history of orderly debate: http://www.rulesonline.com

The foundations of democracy have been shaken by this action.